It is taking longer than expected to fetch the next song to play. The music should be playing soon. If you get tired of waiting, you can try reloading your browser.


Please check our Help page for information about troubleshooting Pandora on your browser.
Your Pandora One subscription will expire shortly.
close
Your Pandora One trial subscription will expire shortly. Upgrade to continue unlimited, ad-free listening.
You've listened to hours of Pandora this month. Consider upgrading to Pandora One.
Close
Hi . Pandora is using Facebook to personalize your experience. Learn MoreNo Thanks
-0:00
0:00
Change Skin

We created Pandora to put the Music Genome Project directly in your hands

It’s a new kind of radio –
stations that play only music you like

 
Create an account for free. Register
Now Playing
Music Feed
My Profile
Create a Station
People who also like this

Tim Weisberg

Tim Weisberg is a pop/jazz flautist whose career has carried him across a brace of solo albums and session work with the Monkees, the Carpenters, Dave Mason, Kim Carnes, and David Benoit, and to collaborations with Herbie Hancock. His greatest success, and most familiar role before the public, however, has come from his work with the late Dan Fogelberg, in particular their first joint album, Twin Sons of Different Mothers (1978).

Weisberg was born in Hollywood, California in 1943. His musical fate was decreed by a series of life's little accidents. While attending the 7th grade, he wanted to join the junior high school band, figuring on being the drummer, but as the positions were parceled out to students in alphabetical order, the drummer spot (and everything else that was obvious) were spoken for by the time Weisberg got to make his pick, and all that was left were the bassoon and the flute. The latter seemed the easier instrument to learn and to transport, so that became his choice. A combination of a good teacher and some early success in getting a sound out of the instrument that he appreciated sealed the deal, and the fact that Weisberg was more into soul and R&B than the surf music that surrounded him didn't hurt, as soul music was expanding into range out of sounds to rainbow-like dimensions in the mid-'60s, which included the use of the flute; the instrument also became a preferred substitute for his own singing voice, which he has always conceded has great limitations. Initially to master the instrument, however, he concentrated on classical music, and then moved into the more improvisation-friendly fields of jazz and soul, while playing pop music to make money.

By the late '60s, he was well-enough known around Los Angeles to get session work; his earliest credit is on the late-era Monkees album The Monkees Present (1969). At that time, the flute wasn't a very common instrument in popular music, and it was mostly known around the edges. Herbie Mann and Hubert Laws were making names for themselves in jazz with a strong crossover appeal, and Jeremy Steig was building a cult following on the East Coast with a mix of jazz and rock, while across the Atlantic a fellow named Ian Anderson was starting to make some noise with an odd mix of folk, blues, and rock, while Mel Collins of King Crimson was starting to gain a cult following for their work. But apart from Ray Thomas of the Moody Blues, who were regularly reaching the upper regions of the charts, there wasn't too much awareness of the instrument.

Weisberg got work with players like Paul Horn and became visible enough as a session player so that by 1971, he was able to cut his self-titled debut album. Not coincidentally, that record opened up with a rendition of the Moody Blues' "Nights in White Satin," a song that had a prominent flute part built into its structure, arranged for jazz/pop ensemble. Signed to A&M Records, where his mellow, smooth jazz sounds were perfectly at home, he quickly began building up a following similar to that of his slightly younger contemporary Michael Franks, among college students and more serious high school-age listeners. The early '70s boom in the popularity of the flute, brought about by established virtuosi such as Jean-Pierre Rampal and James Galway, and younger players such as Ransom Wilson, didn't hurt his prospects, while his ever-expanding credits -- which included playing on the Carpenters' best-ever album, A Song for You (1972) -- only enhanced his professional reputation. In 1974, Weisberg had appeared on both Don Kirshner's Rock Concert and The Midnight Special, two of network television's top national showcases for pop and rock music. By the middle of the decade, he was working with smooth jazz keyboard star David Benoit. The year 1977 saw a lot of new career doors open up for him -- Weisberg's song "A Hard Way to Go" was used in the Oscar-winning Woody Allen movie Annie Hall; and he also played on the song "Give Me Some Time," from the album Nether Lands, by Dan Fogelberg. That first meeting led to their collaboration on the 1978 album Twin Sons of Different Mothers. The latter record was a concept album that also broke down beautifully into individual songs (in a manner similar to the first two Blood Sweat & Tears albums), and even managed the neat trick of reviving and expanding a great, overlooked song by the Hollies ("Tell Me to My Face"). The LP went on to become a pop/rock mainstay of the late '70s, parts of it ubiquitous on college and FM radio, as well as yielding the hit single "Power of Gold." The collaboration built gold and later platinum record-level sales. And with Weisberg suddenly a relevant name to several million listeners, A&M issued The Best of Tim Weisberg: Smile! (1979).

Weisberg's collaboration with Fogelberg was the biggest seller of his career, but that career was made as television work followed along with more session engagements and solo albums. In 1995, he and Fogelberg collaborated once more on an album, No Resemblance Whatsoever, though this record didn't sell as well as its predecessor. Their work together ended acrimoniously, with a lawsuit filed by Weisberg against Fogelberg. And at the start of the 21st century, Weisberg was back in the front rank of popular jazz circles when he collaborated with Herbie Hancock on Day Dreams (2002). In addition to his jazz and pop work, Weisberg has also recorded with new age artist David Arkenstone. ~ Bruce Eder, Rovi
full bio

Comments

rhoadesadlje r x
I would also love to hear Hurtwood Edge selections. It's a personal favorite.
I once owned a Hurtwood Edge album. Great music ! Would love to hear pieces from that album on Pandora. Brian F
Tim Weisberg is one of my favorites. I'm sure he's long forgotten, but when he was performing at our station sponsored concert in Seattle with KNUA where I was the midday talent, he danced with me backstage. It was a magical, wonderful night filled with so many talented musicians, unforgettabl e jazz. We had a fresh new station that is a permanent part of my wonderful memory book of stations where I had the most joy. How I miss it all!
does anyone know the name of the album that has a bike rider on the cover, think it was night rider but not sure
Been a long time fan, since his first album -- which was a great make-out disc (unless you had to get up to flip the vinyl). I didn't know he and Dan fogelberg fell out. Too bad. Anyway, GREAT Flautist!
I was living in Dallas, TX up until 1976. Beginning sometime after 1971 and through the time I left Dallas for California, Tim Weisberg and his band played often at a place called Mother Blues on the east side of Dallas. The stage and the area where the audience sat at tiny 2-chair tables was all one space, so we were up close and personal. Somewhere in my junk, I have a very poorly recorded tape (done on an old Radio Shack tape recorder/pla y e r ) of one of his sessions. One of my favorite mem
Thank you for the bio's, It enriches the player in knowing his past. Great. Chris Hansen
Just created the Tim Weisberg radio station...an d got Herbie Blues almost right away
CAN WE PLEASE HAVE SOME MORE SELECTIONS FROM TIM WEISBERG PLEASE?!?!?
melsonaaron
I think he is phenominal!
goldofthefor e s t
Why no biography? Just google him, here's just one tip:
Dan Fogelberg's 1978 Twin Sons of Different Mothers was the first of two collaboratio n s with jazz flutist Tim Weisberg.
listen to the city and dreamspeaker were two great collections
how about the album he did with dan folgerberg. Twin Sons of different Mothers
caleb.parson
he knows his flute
I love Tim's music...I had both of my children with his music playing in the delivery room.
kayseaconkli n
Please add his album "Listen to the City"
bdirnberger
Please...... . . . . a d d more!!!!! I have been a fan since first hearing him at U.C.
Santa Barbara back in early 70's and along with Tom Scott think them two of the best woodwind players period.
please include more of tim weisberg's album

We're sorry, but a browser plugin or firewall may be preventing Pandora from loading.

In order to use Pandora internet radio, please upgrade to a more current browser.

Please check our Help page for more information.

In order to use Pandora internet radio, please upgrade to a more current browser
or install a newer version of Flash (v.10 or later).

In order to use Pandora internet radio, please install Adobe Flash (v.10 or later).

[72, 68, 87, 89, 113, 88, 73, 82, 84, 74, 87, 64, 98, 110, 116, 108, 121, 82, 86, 119, 97, 112, 72, 80, 82, 97, 113, 118, 111, 126, 101, 121, 83, 73, 83, 111, 96, 83, 115, 111, 121, 81, 87, 104, 76, 100, 126, 84, 74, 100, 126, 120, 72, 74, 99, 75, 83, 80, 91, 97, 99, 112, 70, 88, 69, 120, 93, 81, 114, 80, 116, 84, 95, 125, 74, 88, 67, 71, 95, 90, 76, 108, 74, 83, 99, 65, 64, 126, 122, 94, 85, 119, 123, 126, 89, 109, 64, 82, 97, 126, 92, 100, 120, 76, 111, 107, 123, 70, 85, 74, 113, 71, 95, 66, 67, 114, 85, 80, 100, 103, 98, 85, 81, 126, 86, 75, 101, 101, 80, 100, 107, 119, 124, 126, 82, 126, 125, 112, 82, 107, 93, 88, 78, 127, 110, 92, 110, 113, 119, 92, 98, 114, 102, 71, 87, 64, 112, 92, 79, 68, 87, 106, 109, 116, 87, 90, 83, 99, 82, 108, 93, 95, 94, 76, 122, 101, 102, 82, 127, 68, 84, 107, 95, 85, 95, 99, 77, 93, 107, 118, 125, 109, 118, 123, 65, 69, 116, 127, 102, 75, 83, 97, 66, 99, 93, 123, 112, 89, 121, 121, 90, 82, 65, 112, 97, 65, 101, 92, 123, 83, 98, 99, 110, 83, 90, 91, 90, 102, 96, 101, 116, 127, 122, 127, 121, 114, 93, 122, 106, 89, 93, 122, 82, 89, 127, 90, 122, 70, 101, 97, 106, 96, 109, 124, 93, 93, 78, 91, 114, 73, 83, 110, 71, 117, 115, 126, 120, 124, 82, 112, 73, 120, 86, 121, 112, 81, 64, 121, 74, 81, 111, 100, 127, 97, 115, 78, 90, 112, 102, 92, 88, 75, 126, 68, 70, 94, 73, 110, 100, 113, 119, 100, 127, 126, 109, 65, 116, 82, 115, 100, 88, 94, 101, 113, 109, 75, 102, 81, 105, 115, 111, 90, 71, 98, 123, 77, 100, 67, 113, 76, 113, 110, 88, 86, 87, 88, 68, 123, 104, 124, 117, 119, 66, 67, 83, 90, 103, 89, 77, 120, 88, 116, 70, 101, 94, 124, 105, 64, 105, 68, 109, 87, 73, 122, 72, 87, 120, 124, 78, 103, 101, 102, 70, 82, 70, 108, 119, 103, 108, 95, 126, 77, 95, 71, 100, 90, 92, 73, 98, 78, 108, 97, 74, 98, 103, 107, 68, 106, 77, 80, 99, 101, 108, 69, 101, 110, 92, 117, 109, 107, 77, 74, 100, 105, 118, 75, 89, 77, 125, 71, 98, 116, 114, 99, 111, 107, 113, 86, 64, 100, 108, 71, 64, 65, 115, 96, 109, 121, 113, 113, 126, 78, 80, 68, 111, 123, 110, 100, 124, 115, 95, 106, 73, 92, 116, 79, 87, 112, 72, 105, 106, 89, 88, 77, 87, 76, 69, 127, 97, 126, 114, 80, 111, 68, 76, 80, 84, 104, 72, 89, 69, 122, 67, 81, 77, 101, 70, 69, 77, 65, 93, 80, 76, 127, 67, 92, 84, 117, 82, 95, 111, 91, 113, 118, 86, 124, 98, 125, 125, 121, 80, 112]