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Link Wray

Link Wray may never get into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, but his contribution to the language of rockin' guitar would still be a major one, even if he had never walked into another studio after cutting "Rumble." Quite simply, Link Wray invented the power chord, the major modus operandi of modern rock guitarists. Listen to any of the tracks he recorded between that landmark instrumental in 1958 through his Swan recordings in the early '60s and you'll hear the blueprints for heavy metal, thrash, you name it. Though rock historians always like to draw a nice, clean line between the distorted electric guitar work that fuels early blues records to the late-'60s Hendrix-Clapton-Beck-Page-Townshend mob, with no stops in between, a quick spin of any of the sides Wray recorded during his golden decade punches holes in that theory right quick. If a direct line can be traced forward from a black blues musician crankin' up his amp and playing with a ton of violence and aggression to a young white guy doing a mutated form of same, the line points straight to Link Wray, no contest. Pete Townshend summed it up for more guitarists than he probably realized when he said, "He is the king; if it hadn't been for Link Wray and "'Rumble,'" I would have never picked up a guitar."

Everything that was handed down to today's current crop of headbangers from the likes of Led Zeppelin and the Who can be traced back to the guy from Dunn, North Carolina, who started out in 1955 recording for Starday as a member of Lucky Wray & the Palomino Ranch Hands. You see, back in the early '50s, it was a different ball game altogether. Rock & roll hadn't become a national event in the United States yet, and if you were young and white and wanted to be in the music business, you had two avenues for possible career moves. You could be a pop-mush crooner like Perry Como or a hillbilly singer like the late Hank Williams, and that was about it. With country music all around him as a youth in North Carolina, the choice was obvious; Wray joined forces with his brothers Vernon and Doug, forming Lucky Wray & the Lazy Pine Wranglers, later changing the band name to the spiffier-sounding Palomino Ranch Hands. By the end of 1955, they had relocated outside of Washington, D.C., and added Shorty Horton on bass. With Link, Horton, and brothers Doug and Vernon ("Lucky," named after his gambling fortunes) handling drums and lead vocals respectively, they fell in with some local songwriters, and the results made it to vinyl as an EP on the local Kay label, with the rest of the sides being leased to Starday Records down in Texas.

But by 1958, the music had changed, and so had Wray's life. With a lung missing from a bout with tuberculosis during his stint in the Korean War, Link was advised by his doctor to let brother Vernon do all the vocalizing. So Link started stretching out more and more on the guitar, coming up with one instrumental after another. By this time, the band had sweated down to a trio, and changed its name to the Ray Men. After a brief flirtation as a teen idol -- changing his name to Ray Vernon -- the third Wray brother became the group's producer/manager. Armed with a 1953 Gibson Les Paul, a dinky Premier amp, an Elvis sneer, and a black leather jacket, Link started playing the local record hops around the D.C. area with disc jockey Milt Grant, who became his de facto manager. One night during a typical set, says Link, "They wanted me to play a stroll. I didn't know any, so I made one up. I made up "'Rumble.'"

"Rumble" was originally issued on Archie Bleyer's Cadence label back in 1958, and Bleyer was ready to pass on it when his daughter expressed excitement for the primitive instrumental, saying it reminded her of the rumble scenes in West Side Story. Bleyer renamed it (what its original title was back then, if any, is now lost to the mists of time), and "Rumble" jumped to number 16 on the national charts, despite the fact that it was banned from the radio in several markets (including New York City), becoming Wray's signature tune to this day. But despite the success and notoriety of "Rumble," it turned out to be Wray's only release on Cadence. Bleyer, under attack for putting out a record that was "promoting teenage gang warfare," wanted to clean Link and the boys up a bit, sending them down to Nashville to cut their next session with the Everly Brothers' production team calling the shots. The Wrays didn't see it that way, so they immediately struck a deal with Epic Records. Link's follow-up to "Rumble" was the pounding, uptempo "Rawhide." The Les Paul had been swapped for a Danelectro Longhorn model (with the longest neck ever manufactured on a production line guitar), its "lipstick tube" pickups making every note of Link's power chords sound like he was strumming with a tin can lid for a pick. The beat and sheer blister of it all was enough to get it up to number 23 on the national charts, and every kid who wore a black leather jacket and owned a hot rod had to have it.

But a pattern was emerging that would continue throughout much of Wray's early career; the powers that be figured that if they could tone him down and dress him up, they'd sell way more records in the bargain. What all these producers and record execs failed to realize was the simplest of truths: if Duane Eddy twanged away for white, teenage America, Link Wray played for juvenile delinquent hoods, plain and simple. By the end of 1960, Wray found himself in the mucho-confining position of recording with full orchestras, doing dreck like "Danny Boy" and "Claire de Lune." But when these gems failed to chart as well, relations with Epic came to a close, and by years' end, Link and Vern formed their own label, Rumble Records.

Rumble's three lone issues included the original version of Wray's next big hit, "Jack the Ripper." If "Rumble" sounded like gang warfare, then "Jack the Ripper" sounded like a high-speed car chase, which is exactly what it became the movie soundtrack for in the Richard Gere version of Breathless. Link's amp was recorded at the end of a hotel staircase for maximum echo effect, while he pumped riffs through it that would become the seeds of a million metal songs. After kicking up noise locally for a couple of years, it was going through another period of disc jockey spins when Swan Records of Philadelphia picked it up and got it nationwide attention. Certainly Wray was at his most prolific during his tenure with Swan, and label president Bernie Binnick gave Link and Vernon pretty much free rein to do what they wanted. Turning the family chicken coop into a crude, three-track studio, the Wray family spent the next decade recording and experimenting with sounds and styles.

At least now they could succeed -- or fail -- on their own terms. Most of these sides were leased out as one-shot deals to a zillion microscopic labels under a variety of names like the Moon Men, the Spiders, the Fender Benders, etc. What fueled this period of maximum creativity is open to debate. A lot of it had to do with the fact that Link and the boys honed their particular brand of rockin' mayhem working some of the grimiest joints on the face of the planet when these tracks were cut. When Swan label chief Binnick was questioned as to how he could issue such wild-a** material, he would smile, throw his hands up in the air and say, "What can you do with an animal like that?"

As the new decade dawned, Link Wray's sound and image were updated for the hippie marketplace. Wray's career fortunes waxed and waned throughout the '70s, a muddle of albums in a laid-back style doing little to enhance his reputation. After a stint backing '70s rockabilly revivalist Robert Gordon, Wray went solo again, taking most of Gordon's band (including drummer Anton Fig) with him. But if the studio sides were a bit uneven, he still could pack a wallop live, and his rare forays on the stages of the world spread the message that rock & roll's original wild guitar man still had plenty of gas left in the tank.

Wray married and moved to Denmark in 1980, recording the stray album for the foreign market, and throughout the 1990s he was still capable of strapping on a guitar and making it sound nastier than anyone in his sixties had a right to. And his back catalog got a lot attention in the '90s when the grunge revolution hit, with several young, hip guitarists citing Wray as an influence, and his early work continued to be reissued under various imprints. He recorded two new albums for Ace Records, Shadowman in 1997 and Barbed Wire in 2000 and toured up until his death in Copenhagen on November 5, 2005. ~ Cub Koda & Steve Leggett, Rovi
full bio

Selected Discography

Comments

Love this song
Great music!
The orginal definition of cool.....wha t more can you say......if not my favorite guitarist in my top three......g e n i u s .
rickshouseof b e a u t y s
Link wray is a legend
Not sayin their not great or important Im not defending rrhof..but they don't seem famous NOW DONT KILL ME I never heard of them.
If link wray really isn't in the hall of fame yet, i would be so ashamed if i was one of those people incharged of that bullshit organization . Link is God!!!
sherer50
Disco and rap are in the HOFand Wray isin't. R&R died when the first disco hit the airways.
On the ballot this year. The fan poll is up.
Link wray radio is my favorite Pandora station
LINK WRAY the man .......... rokkin out hardcore.
"Rumble" was originally titled "Oddball" you goofballs!
Ahhhhhhh!!! Yaaaaaaaa!!!
superfly.tnt 5
Most underrated guitarist in rock & roll history.
Link is up there with Hendrix and Dick Dale in terms of what he did for Rock n Roll. It really sad that he never gets any recognition for his efforts.
How did that girl made that one hit wonder pop song and make it to the rock and roll hall of fame, but not this genius that invented power chords.
Considering some of the weaker members of the HOF, LW not being there is just one more crime perpetrated by the most jive institution in the history of rock.
info15093
Link Wray was fundamental to Virgin Record's early success - Beans and Fatback was phenomenal!
He was to cool for the RRHF, in a class by himself!
This man deserves to be in the rock and roll hall of fame!! Long live Link Wray!
michaelhigh5
Saw dude at a St. Louis Blues and Roots festival shortly before he split, probably 1999. He played a chrome Strat and a hundred watt Marshall pointed into a big brick alleyway for echo. My friend Terry Welty did sound with his big modern PA, and it was one of the wildest, loudest, totally rockingest shows ever. RIP Link.
I've been deprived. I never even heard of this guy and I'm a big Zep and grunge fan. Thanks Pandora.
R&R HOF......... . . . . . . W h a t a joke! Link RULES!!!
he was playin in a bowling alley in south jersey i think the summer before he died.
i could of went but didn't///sho u l d of gone //damn it//it was 150 miles//still should have gone....crap
LINK WRAY'S MUSIC KICK A** . HE'S ROCKIN' IN HEAVEN
glasscock11
I believe Rumble was originally called Oddball.
proof that cool transcends boundaries.. . b a d a s s guitar playin'
All right my Pandora brothers and sisters lets help Link
Wray get in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Phone # 216-781-7625 or try staff@rockha l l . o r g . Rumble alone should warrant Hall of Fame status.
a pioneer with no real credit. so typical in today's america. blah
ROCKNFUCKNRO L L !
Listen to those Power Chords! This guy was playing this stuff in the 50's! Link was a true Rebel - RIP
akhancock2
He showed up at one of CDB's Volunteer Jams back in the early 80's. The hard core southern rock crowd didn't have any idea who he was. By the end of his set the whole auditorium was completely rockin''. I figure he was around 60 yr old then. The real Mcoy for sure.
creolelorrai n e d u l e c h e
i would like to see him and michael doucet team up....cajun fiddle and rockabilly-s u r f guitar....oh h h h the possibilitie s ! ! !
WHY...WHY... T H I S GUY NEEDS...TO BE IN HALL OF FAME!!!!! HE IS HENDRIX...HE BE NEIL YOUNG...HE BE STEVE RAY....HE BE.....ALLLL L L SURF GUITAR....SU R F MUSIC..COMIN G BACK...HAWAI I A N . . . . C H R I S ISSACK...ALO H A . . T O M M Y T .
johnnyohania n
Anyone named after our 16th president is just OK by me.
Hey, PAndora, this is one of the best bios i've yet seen on yo' weBsite yo
Wham!!!!!
this is my first time hearing his music, but I definitely like it!!! - it's got good soul coming out of his voice & guitar...
unknownlocal s
I saw Link Wray the year before he passed in Houston.
Got there early & was like the 2nd person in line.
He did a warm up/sound check, by himself, that was amazing!!!
saw link wray at the keystone in palo alto cal. in the 70s. he
blew the roof off what a night
cologero
Link Wray is Rock an Roll.
Yeah, I think Link deserves to be inducted, no doubt. but, hey, I'm a kid from the 70s-80s and hell, it's high time to put RUSH in the R.& R.H.O.F.
Dig him up. Get him on stage again. The way I see it this thing is far from over.
johnnylee194 5
There will never be another... as good as Link.
Oh yeah he will. The Rock H.O.F. can't avoid him for long!
djlprojects
Awesome! He is the main inspiration for me to be a Rockabilly singer and musician! Elvis, Buddy Holly, Eddie Cochran, Conway Twitty, Bobby Rydell, Robert Gordon, the Blasters, and Brian Setzer and the Stray Cats are my all-time faves!
He is the "Link" between Big Bill Bruncie and Robert Johnson all the way to Eric Clapton, Jimmy Paige and even now the great neo Flamenco of players like Strunz and Farah, Paco di Lucia, and even Jesse Cook. Put him in the Hall of Fame already. Steve Cropper would agree with me....
rhmotley
I had the priviledge of seeing Link in person several times. He even used my guitar once to play RAWHIDE on. He was great!!!!!
Man takes me back. Those were the day watching the show and eating peanut butter and jelly sandwiches with my brother.
Link should be in the Rock and Roll hall of fame. Most of the no talent headbangers and slugs that have already been inducted have no business being there, and to leave Mr. Wray out leads me to question the competency of the people who make the decisions. Keep Rock and Roll just that- Rock and Roll. If someone wants to start a heavy metal hall of fame or a rap hall of fame, do it, but that garbage has no business being included as Rock. Link is Rock- better than most. As good as any.
surf rocking music
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